Category Archives: Tips and Tricks

Temple University Performing Arts Center Dome Repair

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In the heart of Philadelphia sits an incredible treasure – the Temple Performing Arts Center.   Purchased in 1974 by Temple University the Baptist Temple was designated as historic and a landmark building.  It underwent an extensive remodeling and has since hosted many great performing artists.

Superior Scaffold was called in by Temple University to help with the renovation of the two copper domes on top of the center.  Over the years, the copper had oxidized and the wood beneath had fallen into disrepair. It was Superior Scaffold’s job to get the crews up there to do the renovation.

The first challenge was to fashion a decorative but functional entryway / canopy that not only showed off the grandeur of the classic building but supported the tremendous load of scaffolding above.

  

“It not only had to allow pedestrians access to the center but it had to look great and allow crews to reach the top to work on the new copper domes,” said Tom Creighton of Superior.

  

The additional challenge was not to damage any of the decorate artifacts or stonework on the roof.

 

Superior has more experience working with historic structures in Philly and is the best when delicate items need to be considered. (see Independence Hall)

Superior crews built a super-stable platform extending all the way around the base of the dome and built two work decks above the entire diameter of the domes – allowing renovation crews total access.

The crews had to strip off the decaying copper and rebuild the wood support beneath.

The new domes look amazing and we will post a photo as soon as we can.  Temple University is one of our   favorite clients and we were honored to help with their renovation.

Historic buildings are our speciality.  Don’t hesitate to contact Superior Scaffold
for all of your scaffolding needs (215) 743-2200 – Ask for Tommy.

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New Copper Swages or Ferrules for Suspended Scaffold wire ropes

Our Superior Scaffold Suspended expert tells us about the new copper swages.

Why they are stronger, safer, and better than traditional bolt on ferrules or fist grips for wire ropes and tie-downs.

Very simply put – time and safety.  Traditionally, you had to make sure each of your fist grips were tightened sufficiently before getting to work.  With these new copper swages you are safe and secure and working the minute you hit the job site.

Another helpful hint from Superior Scaffold.  Also see scaffolding

Superior Scaffold introduces the new 4 wire electric system for suspended scaffolds

Our expert tells us about how this new 4 wire electric system replaces the traditional heavy 110 transformers on suspended scaffolds.

This is the first in a series of videos that will give tips and advice for the suspended scaffold / scaffolding users.

Getting Press for our Company Part 2 (writing a press release and searching contacts)

Okay – we’ve made our plan.  We’ve picked the project that would be great for all of America to talk about (the renovation of Independence Hall) and we’ve gotten some fantastic photos of both phases of the job site.

Now what?

How do we get press for the scaffold work we’ve done?   We started by compiling a list of contacts that we have had over the years.  Some are still valid and some are not – but we look at them as possible leads to run a story on us.  While we are culling through our possible contacts we write a press release detailing our role in the renovation process.  Since we were not the general contractor (GC) but the scaffold company, we have a slightly different role in the process (mainly designing, renting, transporting and erecting the scaffolding).

So we come up with our angle on the story.  Every press release needs an angle.  Since the major papers in the area have all done a generic story on the renovation of the beloved landmark we need something new, something fresh that will still tie into the overall renovation project.

We find it in the decorative scrim that was added to our scaffolding.  That’s a cool story because, not only does the scrim add a great look to building while renovations are taking place but the structural engineering changes that had to be made to accommodate it were pretty significant.  So we detailed the equipment, the procedures and even include a few quotes from the engineers and the CEO of the company – and boom.  We are ready to get it out to the public.

For the correct format of writing a press release and/or what to include you can google or hit any of the search engines “How to write a good press release” and you’ll get plenty of guidance.

We knew that we wanted to be placed in some of the industry magazines so that’s where we focused.

A home run.  See part 3.